Software Updates at SOUPS 2017

We describe a few highlights from our recent paper on mobile software updating that will be presented at the 2017 Usenix Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security (SOUPS).

What did we do?: Software updates are essential to maintain the security of devices and software, and therefore it’s important that users install them at the earliest. In our study, we investigated Android users’ attitudes and preferences towards automatic application updates—updates that are installed without users’ consent—using a survey.

How did we do it?: We conducted the survey on the Amazon Mechanical Turk platform. The survey contained three parts. In the first part, participants filled out several psychometric scales, which captured their risk taking propensity, consideration for future consequences, curiosity, and their security awareness. In the second part, participants self-reported their Android update settings, and their preferences towards auto-updating their applications. Finally, in the third part, participants reported past negative experiences with software updating.

What did we find?: Our findings reveal that Android users who avoid application auto-updates are more likely to have had past negative experiences with software updating, tend to take fewer risks, and display greater proactive security awareness. Users’ perceived level of trust with mobile applications also determined how comfortable they are auto-updating these applications.

What are the implications of the work?: Based on our findings, we make four primary recommendations to improve the design of mobile application updates on Android to encourage users to auto-update. First, we suggest that an improvement to the current Android OS would be to provide users with a more accessible mechanism to rollback application updates to a prior point in time to encourage users to be more risk taking with respect to turning on auto-updates. Second, we suggest leveraging the characteristics we identified of users who avoid auto-updating, including their risk averse nature, to design nudges and messages to encourage users into auto-updating security updates. Third, we suggest that the security community study the practices of software developers, how they develop and build updates, and how these practices lead to negative experiences for end-users. Finally, we suggest that an improved Android application interface for updates could be personalized by inferring users’ attitudes towards their Android applications and preferences for auto-updating those applications using our work as a starting point. Doing so may encourage more users to auto-update their mobile applications, which will ultimately affect the security of their devices.

Read the SOUPS 2017 paper for more details!

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